About NEA’s Report Card

NEA’s Report Card measures members of Congress’ overall support for public education and educators. Each member receives a letter grade of A, B, C, D or F based on their records on selected votes (see below) and these criteria:

  • Cosponsoring bills critical to advancing NEA’s identified legislative priorities
  • Behind-the-scenes work to advance or impede NEA priority issues
  • Committee votes in support of or against NEA priorities
  • Accessibility of the member and staff in Washington DC to NEA staff and leaders
  • Accessibility and education advocacy in the member’s home state or district

Votes and other actions involving union rights are also emphasized. We believe it is important to hold lawmakers accountable at a time when both public and private sector unions and the right to bargain collectively are under severe attack.

Votes cast in the full U.S. House and Senate are the main criteria for Report Card grades. Members of Congress are notified in writing any time a pending vote may be scored.

Report Card for the 116th Congress (2019 – 2020)

Selected votes

U.S. House of Representatives

  • Federal Civilian Workforce Pay Raise Fairness Act of 2019 (H.R. 790) by Rep. Connolly (D-VA): NEA supported this bill to bring the 2019 pay increase for civilian federal employees in line with the raise the military received. Those employees include the faculty and staff of 164 schools, serving more than 73,000 students, operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) in 11 foreign countries, 7 states, Guam, and Puerto Rico. The legislation passed by a vote of 259-161 on January 30, 2019. (House Vote 1-64)
  • Recognizing Achievement in Classified School Employees Act (H.R. 276) by Rep. Titus (D-NV): NEA supported this bill directing the Secretary of Education to establish the Recognizing Inspiring School Employees (RISE) Award Program for education support professionals (ESPs) who provide essential services to students from pre-K-to grade 12. The legislation passed by a vote of 387-19 on February 25, 2019. (House Vote 1-89)
  • Undoing President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency (H.J. Res. 46) by Rep. Castro (D-TX): NEA supported this resolution to prevent diverting billions of dollars appropriated by Congress for other purposes to building a wall on our southern border. Declaring a national emergency when one does not exist is a power grab that undermines the separation of powers fundamental to our system of government. The legislation passed by a vote of 245-182 on February 26, 2019. (House Vote 1-94)
  • Background Checks Act of 2019 (H.R. 8) by Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA): NEA supported this bill to require a background check for every gun sold as well as most transfers. Firearms are the leading cause of death for African American children, and the second leading cause of death for all American children. The legislation passed by a vote of 240-190 on February 27, 2019. (House Vote 1-99)
  • Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019 (H.R. 1585) by Rep. Bass (D-CA): NEA supported this bill to protect victims, invest in preventing sexual assaults, improve access to safe housing and economic stability, and close the “boyfriend loophole” by keeping firearms out of the hands of convicted abusers, stalkers, and people under court-issued restraining orders. The legislation passed by a vote of 263-158 on April 4, 2019. (House Vote 1-156)
  • Equality Act (H.R. 5) by Rep. Cicilline (D-RI): NEA supported this bill to provide consistent non-discrimination protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity by amending federal laws such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Fair Housing Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, and the Jury Act. Doing so would help educators cultivate nurturing and supportive school environments for LGBTQ students and safeguard LGBTQ educators. The legislation passed by a vote of 236-173 on May 17, 2019. (House Vote 1-217)
  • American Dream and Promise Act of 2019 (H.R. 6) by Rep. Roybal-Allard (D-CA): NEA supported this bill to provide a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers brought to this country as minors, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, and people granted Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for humanitarian reasons—populations that include tens of thousands of students and educators. The legislation passed by a vote of 237-187 on June 4, 2019. (House Vote 1- 240)
  • Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, Defense, State, Foreign Operations, and Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2020 (H.R. 2740) by Rep. DeLauro (D-CT): NEA supported this bill to increase funding for key education programs including Title I, Title II, IDEA, community schools, Pell grants, and more. The legislation passed by a vote of 226-203 on June 19, 2019. (House Vote 1-367)
  • Middle Class Health Benefits Tax Repeal Act (H.R. 748) by Rep. Courtney (D-CT): NEA supported this bill to eliminate the 40 percent excise tax on “high cost” employer-sponsored health plans scheduled to take effect in 2022. Under the Affordable Care Act, the tax would apply to the portion of employer-sponsored health benefits whose value exceeds specified thresholds: an estimated $11,200 for single coverage and $30,150 for family coverage. The legislation passed by a vote of 419-6 on July 17, 2019. (House Vote 1-493)
  • Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 (H.R. 3877) by Rep. Yarmuth (D-KY): NEA supported this bill to lift the budget caps introduced in 2011 and prevent severe cuts in non-defense discretionary (NDD) funding for fiscal 2020 and 2021. In fiscal 2020 alone, the budget caps would result in automatic cuts of $55 billion to NDD programs. The legislation passed by a vote of 284-149 on July 25, 2019. (House Vote 1-511)
  • Voting Rights Advancement Act of 2019 (H.R. 4) by Rep. Sewell (D-AL): NEA supported this bill to require states and localities with recent histories of voter discrimination to seek approval from the Department of Justice before making any changes in their election laws. The measure is a direct response to the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby v. Holder, which invalidated key provisions of the Voting Rights Act first passed in 1965. The legislation passed by a vote of 228-187 on December 6, 2019. (House Vote 1-654)
  • FUTURE Act (H.R. 5363) by Rep. Adams (D-NC): NEA supported this bill to permanently reauthorize and provide $255 million in annual mandatory funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). It also streamlines the federal financial aid process and paperwork for federal student loan borrowers on income-driven repayment plans. The legislation passed the House by a vote of 319-96 on December 10, 2019. (House Vote 1-659)
  • Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (amended H.R. 1865) by Rep. Pascrell (D-NJ): NEA supported this bill to increase funding for key education programs including Title I, Title II, IDEA, community schools, Pell grants, and more; extend the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) and Community Self-Determination Act for two years; permanently repeal the Affordable Care Act’s tax on “high cost” health plans; and provide funding for gun violence research and the 2020 Census. The legislation passed by a vote of 297-120 on December 17, 2019. (House Vote 1-689)
  • Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201) by Rep. Lowey (D-NY): NEA supported this bill to provide free testing for COVID-19, paid sick and emergency leave (for some), and bolster unemployment insurance, food initiatives, and federal support for Medicaid. The legislation passed by a vote of 363-40 on March 14, 2020. (House Vote 2-102)
  • HEROES Act (H.R. 6800) by Rep. Lowey (D-NY): NEA supported this bill to provide $3 trillion to address the coronavirus crisis, including $915 billion in direct relief for state and local governments that can be used pay educators and other vital workers, $90 billion to stabilize education funding, and $3.6 billion to protect voters’ access to the polls. The bill also takes steps to narrow the digital divide and close the homework gap, furnishes personal protective equipment (PPE) for educators and other frontline workers, and provides relief for student loan borrowers. The legislation passed by a vote of 208-199 on May 15, 2020. (House Vote 2-109)
  • George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020 (H.R. 7120) by Rep. Bass (D-CA): NEA supported this bill that takes initial steps to end police brutality, protect the civil rights and liberties of all people, and change the culture of law enforcement agencies. The legislation passed by a vote of 236-181 on June 25, 2020. (House Vote 2-119)
  • Congressional disapproval of the U.S. Department of Education’s revised borrower defense to repayment rule (H.J. Res. 76) by Rep. Susie Lee (D-NV): NEA supported this resolution to override President Trump’s veto and overturn the rule making it harder for students defrauded by unscrupulous colleges to cancel their federal student loan debt. Veterans, older students, students of color, students with disabilities, and students who are the first in their families to attend college are among those most likely to be affected. The 238-173 vote on June 26, 2020 fell short of the two-thirds necessary to override Trump’s veto. (House Vote 2-120)
  • Washington, D.C. Admission Act (H.R. 51) by Del. Norton (D-DC): NEA supported this bill to make the District of Columbia a state and give its residents the same rights as the residents of the other 50 states, including two voting members in the Senate and one in the House of Representatives. The legislation passed by a vote of 232-180 on June 26, 2020. (House Vote 2-122)
  • Moving Forward Act/INVEST in America Act (H.R. 2) by Rep. DeFazio (D-OR): NEA supported this bill, which incorporates the Rebuild America’s School Act that creates a $70 billion grant program and $30 billion tax-credit bond program targeting high-poverty schools whose facilities pose health and safety risks to students and staff. The legislation passed by a vote of 233-188 on July 1, 2020. (House Vote 2-138)
  • FUTURE Act (H.R. 2486) by Rep. Adams (D-NC): NEA supported this bill, which incorporates the NO BAN Act that repeals all versions of the administration’s Muslim, refugee, and asylum bans. The legislation passed by a vote of 233-183 on July 22, 2020. (House Vote 2-153)
  • Child Care Is Essential Act (H.R. 7027) by Rep. DeLauro (D-CT): NEA supported this bill to provide funding for affordable, quality child care so people return to work and businesses to normalcy during the COVID -19 pandemic. The legislation passed by a vote of 249-163 on July 29, 2020. (House Vote 2-171)
  • Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill included in the National Defense Authorization Act, 2021 (H.R. 7617), Amendment 219 by Rep. Allen (R-GA): NEA opposed this amendment to reduce education funding by 5 percent across the board. Schools need more money, not less, to reopen safely and provide meaningful distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. The amendment was rejected by a vote of 292-123 on July 31, 2020. (House Vote 2-176)
  • Delivering for America Act (H.R. 8015) by Rep. Maloney (D-NY). NEA supported this bill to provide $25 billion in immediate relief for the United States Postal Service. The legislation passed by a vote of 257-150 on August 22, 2020. (House Vote 2-182)

U.S. SENATE

  • Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2019, Amendment 5 by Sens. McConnell (R-KY) and Shelby (R-AL): NEA opposed this legislation to provide $5.7 billion for a permanent border wall. The legislation was rejected by a vote of 50-47 on January 24, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-9)
  • Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2019, Amendment 6 by Sen. Schumer (D-NY): NEA supported this amendment, a package of House-passed appropriations bills that would reopen the federal government until February 8. The amendment, which required 60 votes, was rejected by a vote of 52-44 on January 24, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-10)
  • William Barr’s nomination as Attorney General of the United States. NEA opposed confirming Barr on the grounds that he cannot be trusted to protect our students’ civil rights or take action against the unprecedented threats to the rule of law posed by the Trump administration. The nomination was confirmed by a vote of 54-45 on February 14, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-24)
  • Undoing President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency (H.J. Res. 46) by Rep. Castro (D-TX): NEA supported this resolution to prevent diverting billions of dollars appropriated by Congress for other purposes to building a wall on our southern border. Declaring a national emergency when one does not exist is a power grab that undermines the separation of powers fundamental to our system of government. The legislation passed by a vote of 59-41 on March 14, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-49)
  • Limit debate on judicial nominees (S. Res. 50) by Sen. Lankford (R-OK). In this vote, NEA supported a procedural motion to block efforts to limit debate on all federal district court nominees and the majority of executive branch nominees going forward. The legislation was rejected by a vote of 48-51 on April 3, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-61)
  • Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 (H.R. 3877) by Rep. Yarmuth (D-KY): NEA supported this bill to lift the budget caps introduced in 2011 and prevent severe cuts in non-defense discretionary (NDD) funding for fiscal 2020 and 2021. In fiscal 2020 alone, the budget caps would result in automatic cuts of $55 billion to NDD programs. The legislation passed by a vote of 67-28 on August 1, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-262)
  • Eugene Scalia’s nomination as Secretary of Labor: NEA opposed this nomination because Scalia has devoted his entire career to undercutting workers’ rights, protecting corporations at the expense of employees and consumers, and threatening workers’ retirement security. The nomination was confirmed by a vote of 53-44 on September 26, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-313)
  • Steven Menashi’s nomination to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit: NEA opposed Menashi because his writings and record raise serious concerns about whether he can be trusted to be fair-minded and dispense equal justice to all who come before him. As acting general counsel of the Department of Education, Menashi played a key role in carrying out the disastrous policies of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. The nomination was confirmed by a vote of 51-41 on November 14, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-356)
  • Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (amended H.R. 1865) by Rep. Pascrell (D-NJ): NEA supported this bill to increase funding for key education programs including Title I, Title II, IDEA, community schools, Pell grants, and more; extend the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) and Community Self-Determination Act for two years; permanently repeal the Affordable Care Act’s tax on “high cost” health plans; and provide funding for gun violence research and the 2020 Census. The legislation passed by a vote of 71-23 on December 19, 2019. (Senate Vote 1-415)
  • Congressional disapproval of the U.S. Department of Education’s revised borrower defense to repayment rule (H.J. Res 76) by Rep. Susie Lee (D-NV) NEA supported this resolution to overturn the rule making it harder for students defrauded by unscrupulous colleges to cancel their federal student loan debt. Veterans, older students, students of color, students with disabilities, and students who are the first in their families to attend college are among those most likely to be affected. The legislation passed by a 53-42 vote on March 11, 2020. (Senate Vote 2-70)
  • Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201), Amendment 1559 by Sen. Murray (D-WA): NEA supported this amendment to provide emergency sick days and paid leave for all working people for two years. The amendment (which required 60 votes) was rejected by vote of 51-47 on March 18, 2020. (Senate Vote 2-74)
  • Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201) by Rep. Lowey (D-NY): NEA supported this bill to provide free testing for COVID-19; paid sick and emergency leave (for some); and bolster unemployment insurance, food initiatives, and federal support for Medicaid. The legislation passed by a vote of 90-8 on March 18, 2020. (Senate Vote 2-76)
  • Justin Walker’s nomination to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit: NEA opposed this nomination because Walker’s record raises serious concerns about his ability to be a fair-minded and impartial judge. He is hostile to health care, public education, and has clearly demonstrated a commitment to using the courts to achieve political goals, not dispense equal justice. The nomination was confirmed by a vote of 51-42 on June 18, 2020. (Senate Vote 2-123)
  • Skinny COVID-19 relief package (S. 178) brought forward by Majority Leader McConnell (R-KY): NEA opposed this bill because it does not do nearly enough to protect the health and financial stability of families; does not provide the resources necessary for safe and effective operation of public K-12 schools, colleges, and universities during the pandemic; and does nothing to stabilize state and local governments or protect critical public services. The 52-47 vote on the legislation on September 10, 2020 fell short of the 60 votes necessary for it to advance. (Senate Vote 2-168)
  • Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court: NEA opposed this nomination because Barrett’s record raises concerns that she supports overturning the Affordable Care Act, favors limiting tools to fight employment discrimination and protections for immigrants, condones discrimination against individuals with disabilities, and opposes holding students accountable for sexual harassment. During her confirmation hearing, she refused to acknowledge voter discrimination, voter intimidation, and would not say that a president should commit to a peaceful transfer of power, cannot unilaterally change Election Day, or pardon himself. The nomination was confirmed by a vote of 52-48 on October 26, 2020. (Senate Vote 2-224)