Posted In: Election 2012

Obama, Biden stand up for students, education at convention

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by Félix Pérez

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and community college professor Jill Biden, the vice president’s wife, closed out the Democratic National Convention last night on a high note, highlighting the role of education in the lives of Americans and in the nation’s economic recovery.

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“Education was the gateway to opportunity for me. It was the gateway for Michelle. And now more than ever, it is the gateway to a middle-class life,” said President Obama.

Drawing a distinction between his vision and the vision independent analysts say would result from the Mitt Romney-Paul Ryan budget, President Obama said, “And now you have a choice – we can gut education, or we can decide that in the United States of America, no child should have her dreams deferred because of a crowded classroom or a crumbling school. No family should have to set aside a college acceptance letter because they don’t have the money.”

Continuing his contrast with the Romney-Ryan budget proposal, he said:

I refuse to ask students to pay more for college, or kick children out of Head Start programs, or eliminate health insurance for millions of Americans who are poor, elderly, or disabled – all so those with the most can pay less.

President Obama also took the opportunity to compare his removal of banks as middle men for federally guaranteed student loans with Romney’s advice to students to “borrow money from your parents.”

“Millions of students are paying less for college today because we finally took on a system that wasted billions of taxpayer dollars on banks and lenders,” said the president.

Romney and the Republican Party platform would reinsert banks as student loan providers.

 

Vice President Biden came to the defense of DREAMers, students who have done well in school, worked hard and played by the rules but who were brought by their parents to the United States as young children.

“Governor Romney believes — he believes that kids — kids like our DREAMers, those immigrant children who were brought to America’s shores through no fault of their own — he thinks they’re a drag on the American economy.”

Romney has promised to veto the DREAM Act, legislation that would provide a path to citizenship for qualifying students who are in college or the military, and have been raised in the United States.

Biden also took aim at the criticism leveled by Romney and Ryan at President Obama for creating “a culture of dependency.”

“They seem to think you create a culture of dependency when you provide a bright, young, qualified kid from a working-class family a loan to get to college.”

Jill Biden spoke to the convention delegates “not only as the wife of our vice president, but as a full-time teacher.”

“I’m also here tonight for my students — students like Angie — who work so hard to create a better life for themselves and their families. I’ve been a teacher for more than 30 years, and to this day, I continue to teach full time at a community college in northern Virginia.

“Not long after Joe was elected vice president, people started questioning whether I could keep teaching. Not Joe. He was there, standing by my side, saying, “Of course you should. It’s who you are, Jill.” For me, being a teacher isn’t just what I do — it’s who I am.”

Reader Comments

  1. James Heath

    Félix Pérez writes that President Obama said, in his acceptance speech, “… no child should have her dreams deferred because of a crowded classroom or a crumbling school.” So, Mr. Perez, if you wouldn’t mind, was the President suggesting that someone like Condoleeza Rice didn’t achieve her dream of success despite the no doubt crowded classrooms and crumbling schools of her childhood? You know, the ones she grew up with in the Jim Crow South.

    By the way, for those of you out there who are so very certain that I have no idea what it means to teach or at least teach in a public school. I retired after 37 years of teaching: fourteen in independent education, one as adjunct instructor at a community college, and the final twenty-two at a public high school. Check out my blog for an expanded idea of my views on Public Education, You might be surprised.
    Cornvillenutmeg.wordpress.com.

    Reply
    • tina carnevale

      …condoleezza rice did not grow up in a public school environment. her father a preacher, her mother a teacher, and private schooling, for starters, she was raised much more and within middle class family environments, unlike many impoverished kids within the public school system. the saddest part is, what skills and contributions are we missing out on, as a society, by the underdevelopment of such a large number of our youth?

      Reply
    • James Heath

      I stand corrected.

      Reply
  2. Stephen Siegel

    Obama, Biden stand up AFTER Mayor “1%” Emmanuel spoke, king of public school closures, spoke. After Sec. of Ed. Arne Duncan, one of the chief architects of Race to the Bottom charter schools, vouchers, privatizing, standardized testing, national core curriculum, and teacher “accountability” spoke. After Michelle Rhee shared the bogus film about the parent trigger law. After Democrats for Education Deform spread their corporate ed reform propaganda around the convention. Glad to know Obama and Biden stood up. What a joke.

    Reply

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